Human Services Counseling Degree Set

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Human Services (Non-Clinical) Degrees

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NEW DEGREES OFFERED BY DCU – 2014

 

Effective immediately, Dayspring Christian University, Saint Francisville, Louisiana,  has begun to offer 3 new degree sets. DCU will begin to offer classes immediately for these new degrees.  Please see the list of new offerings. DCU consortium schools may begin to offer the several degrees after approval from the Home office in Mississippi.

 

Associate of Human Services Counseling (Non-Clinical) (60 credit hours)

Bachelor of Human Services Counseling (Non-Clinical) (120 credit hours)

Master of Human Services Counseling (Non-Clinical) (46 credit hours)

Doctor of Human Services Counseling (Non-Clinical) (39 credit hours)

Non-Clinical Counseling

A non-clinical counselor can practice with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, but many return for their master’s to provide more comprehensive experience to those they’re working for. Non-clinical work may incorporate therapy, public or private organizations, case management, administration, and more. Many times non-clinical counselors work on counseling and helping their clients with whatever issues they may be having. This can range from working with individuals to secure a new job, to coordinating rehabilitation programs, and more. This typically will have you working with clients on more of a consulting basis, compared to a clinical setting, which will be more comprehensive in services.  (Some information stated here is adopted from the different seminaries and colleges to explain our similar degree offering).

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BACHELOR OF RELIGIOUS SCIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES

& BACHELOR OF HUMAN SERVICES COUNSELING DEGREE PROGRAMS  



Curriculum

 

Counseling Concentration

15 crs

HSV301 Interviewing Methods

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HSV301

Interviewing Methods – 3 Credits

This course provides an opportunity to learn basic communication skills and interviewing techniques essential for working with people. An emphasis is placed on developing skills in listening, intake, assessment and evaluation, referral and report writing. Case studies will be used to explore typical presenting problems and appropriate responses.

3 crs

HSV303 Introduction to Counseling

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HSV303

Introduction to Counseling – 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles, skills, methods and techniques employed in the counseling process. The focus is on establishing rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, assessment, conceptualizing strategies for intervention, and the planning and delivering counseling services. The course will also promote exploration into personal values and professional ethics.

3 crs

HSV309 Theories of Counseling

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HSV309

Theories of Counseling – 3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the basic concepts, theories and approaches that are applied to human services counseling. Students will compare and contrast the various theories that impact contemporary counseling including analytic, experiential, relational, action-oriented and systems approaches.

3 crs

HSV330 Group Counseling

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HSV330

Group Counseling – 3 Credits

This course presents a theoretical foundation for group process and counseling techniques. Students are introduced to the skills and requirements needed for effective group counseling including communication, leadership, problem solving, decision-making, and establishing group membership, norms and goals.

3 crs

HSV368 Crisis Intervention

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HSV368

Crisis Intervention - 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and strategies of crisis theory and practice carried out in a social-psychological and cultural framework. Effective crisis management is explored to learn how people feel, think, and behave during periods of crisis, and what strategies and resources are available to them.

3 crs

 

Criminal Justice Concentration

15 crs

CRJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

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CRJ101

Introduction to Criminal Justice - 3 Credits

The student will be introduced to the American Criminal Justice System from the perspective of the criminal justice professional. The course examines the historical development and role of the police, prosecution, corrections, probation, parole, and rehabilitation.

3 crs

CRJ103 Introduction to Corrections

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CRJ103

Introduction to Corrections - 3 Credits

This course studies the history of corrections, including imprisonment and other forms of punishment, both institutional and non-institutional. The philosophy and rationale for various sentencing alternatives are considered.

3 crs

CRJ331 Community Corrections

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CRJ331

Community Corrections - 3 Credits

This course surveys the origins and development of contemporary practices in probation, parole, and other forms of community corrections, including the impact of these practices on other elements of the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: CRJ103.


    Prerequisite: CRJ103

3 crs

Criminal Justice Elective

3 crs

Criminal Justice Elective

3 crs

 

Human Services Management Concentration

15 crs

 

MGT105 Principles of Management

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MGT105

Principles of Management - 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the principles of management examining their application in public and private, profit and non-profit organizations. Students will explore the areas of employee motivation, group behavior, leadership, strategic planning, organizational design, and career opportunities. Fundamental concepts of management, effective communication competency, ethical dilemmas faced by managers and corporate social responsibility will be explored.

3 crs

MGT201 Human Resource Management

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MGT201

Human Resource Management - 3 Credits

This course includes the presentation, analysis, and discussion of the specific functions of a Human Resources Department, including human relations knowledge and skills vital to the success of any Human Resources manager. Students will explore the standards of performance that are expected of managers, subordinates, and the organization with a special emphasis on the supportive relationships needed between employees and their organizations. This course also will explore a number of contemporary and controversial issues related to Human Resource Management.

Prerequisite: MGT105


    Prerequisite: MGT105

3 crs

MGT350 Public Management

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MGT350

Public Management - 3 Credits

This course studies the management of public organizations/government at the local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis is on the transferability of traditional business management skills to the public sector. There is discussion of evolving career opportunities with emphasis on the variety of educational programs in public management.

Prerequisite: MGT105.


    Prerequisite: MGT105

3 crs

MGT405 Organization Behavior

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MGT405

Organizational Behavior - 3 Credits

This course includes the study of individual and small group behavior in organizations and the interpretation of this behavior in the context of the managerial environment. Students will explore the nature of such concepts as influence, power and control, attitudes, communication, conflict, and interpersonal relations as a means of understanding of the dynamics of group behavior.

Prerequisite: MGT105.


    Prerequisite: MGT105

3 crs

MGT Elective

3 crs

 

Psychology - Health, Education and Community Services Concentration

15 crs

PSY101 Fundamentals of Psychology I

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PSY101

Fundamentals of Psychology I - 3 Credits

This course examines the nature of psychology as a social and behavioral science. It surveys fundamental areas in behavior including research in psychology, the brain and behavior, learning, human development and socialization, intelligence, personality, health psychology, and social psychology.

3 crs

PSY102 Fundamentals of Psychology II

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PSY102

Fundamentals of Psychology II - 3 Credits

This course is a continuation of the concepts introduced in PSY101. It surveys such areas as sensation and perception, states of consciousness, memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and language, psychological disorders, and treatment of psychological disorders.

Prerequisite: PSY101.


    Prerequisite: PSY101

3 crs

PSY306 Abnormal Psychology

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PSY306

Abnormal Psychology - 3 Credits

This course examines the major theories of psychopathology. For each theory treated, consideration is given to the definition of abnormality, supportive research data, classification systems, and suggested intervention strategies.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and Junior class standing


    Prerequisite: PSY101 and Junior class standing

3 crs

PSY201 Child Development

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PSY201

Child Development - 3 Credits

This course emphasizes the psychological development of the child from birth to adolescence. Consideration is given to data, theories, and methods of studying child behavior. Emphasis is placed upon the general characteristics of various stages of development and upon general determinants of the developmental process.

Prerequisite: PSY101

3 crs

PSY260 Educational Psychology

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PSY260

Educational Psychology - 3 Credits

This survey course introduces students to the ways in which psychological aspects of the learning process are investigated and applied. Among the topics addressed are: research in educational psychology; student characteristics; applications of psychological theories to the development of instructional techniques; evaluating student performance; and special education.

Prerequisite: PSY101

3 crs

 

Sociology Health & Community Services Concentration

15 crs

SOC101 Principles of Sociology

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SOC101

Principles of Sociology - 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts in Sociology and an analysis of culture, socialization, stratification, social organization, class, social interaction, social change, and conflict.

3 crs

SOC211 Sociology of Marriage and the Family

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SOC211

Sociology of Marriage and the Family - 3 Credits

This course studies the family as an institution: its structures, problems, functions, and changing patterns in an historical and cross-cultural perspective.

Prerequisite: SOC101.


    Prerequisite: SOC101

3 crs

SOC301 Social Problems

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SOC301

Social Problems - 3 Credits

This course is an in-depth study of the major problems confronting society. Some of the problems studied include crime and violence, sexual inequalities and discrimination, health and illness, poverty and affluence, population and pollution, and crises in the institutions of the family, religion, economics, education, and the political system.

Prerequisite: SOC101.


    Prerequisite: SOC101

3 crs

SOC317 Alcohol & Drugs

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SOC317

Alcohol & Drugs - 3 Credits

This course is concerned with the use patterns, distribution, and social control of drugs and alcohol in modern society. Special emphasis is given to heavy alcohol and drug usage and its impact on such areas as the family, health, crime and delinquency, and work. Cross-cultural comparisons are considered together with intra-cultural factors such as socio-economic patterns, ethnicity, gender, and urbanization. The approach is interdisciplinary and includes contributions from anthropology, social psychology, as well as sociology.

Prerequisite: SOC101.


    Prerequisite: SOC101

3 crs

SOC324 Deviant Behavior

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SOC324

Deviant Behavior - 3 Credits

This course presents “deviance” as endemic to society. Consideration is given to processes of social labeling and stigmatization of “deviant” persons and groups, the development of “deviant” identity, together with an examination of the theories of social organization and disorganization which seek to explain “deviant” behavior.

Prerequisite: SOC101.


    Prerequisite: SOC101

3 crs

 

 ** Requires Prior Approval

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Master of Science in Human Services with a concentration in Clinical Counseling within organizational Settings

Human Services

Master’s

Program Objective: To enable you to advance your human services skills and career options.

 

Program Description: Acquire conceptual, analytical, and operational human service knowledge, which includes a solid understanding of:

 

Human behavior systems

History

Ethics

Major intervention and treatment models

Problem analysis

Organizational/managerial knowledge

 

This program includes three applied concentration tracks:

Alcohol and Drug Counseling

Clinical Counseling

Non-Profit Management

 

Program Outcomes: Upon graduation, you will receive a Master’s degree and be empowered to assume new or more advanced positions in the human services field.

 

Curriculum Overviews

 

The Master of Science in Human Services is a 37-credit hour program consisting of eight core courses and an additional 12 credits in Clinical Counseling within Organizational Settings.

The program includes a foundations course, the sociology of human services, a graduate thesis, which serves as the program's capstone experience, and two practicum field courses as recommended by the Council for Standards in Human Service Education.  The curriculum is as follows:

 

Core Requirements

25 crs.

Courses

Credits

HSV501 Master of Science in Human Services Preparatory Course

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HSV501

Master of Human Services Preparatory Course - 0 Credits (Pass/Fail)

This course is designed as an introduction to the MSHSV program in addition to providing an orientation to the process and technology essential for success in the program. This course will help develop critical thinking skills, professional graduate level writing skills, and review APA writing rules necessary for graduate students to complete the MSHSV program. The course will also be an introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods in research and serve to satisfy the statistics course requirement for admission to the MSHSV program. Additionally, the course will also expose students to relevant ethical and multicultural considerations necessary to be successful as a human service provider. This is a no-credit, pass/fail course with no pre-requisites.

0 crs.

HSV502 Human Services Ethics and Diversity

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HSV502

Human Services Ethics and Diversity - 3 Credits

Consideration of theoretical and practical standards for ethically dealing with individuals and information about them in a multicultural framework within a variety of human service settings.

3 crs.

HSV504 Human Development Through the Lifecycle

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HSV504

Human Development through the Lifecycle - 3 Credits

Examination of theories that are important to the study of lifespan development.  Approaches to physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development throughout the lifespan will be examined with a focus on the influence of context and culture on human development.

3 crs.

HSV510 Human Services Policy

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HSV510

Human Services Policy - 3 Credits

A current examination of the social and public policies that impact the human service organization.  The course will address how human service organizations design, implement, and manage human service programs in response to the political environment and changes in the social environment.

3 crs.

HSV511 Human Service Management

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HSV511

Human Service Management - 3 Credits (To be offered beginning January 2013)

This course provides students with knowledge, theory and technical skills in the administration of human service delivery systems. Course content includes management theory, principles of organization, planning, budgeting, fiscal responsibility, supervision and human resource management.

3 crs.

HSV512 Applied Research Methods in Human Services

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HSV512

Applied Research Methods in Human Services - 3 Credits

This course presents an overview of frequently used quantitative and qualitative research methods. It prepares students to be critical consumers of scholarly social science research. It also examines the ways in which social science research can inform daily practice in various social service agencies.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 21-24 credits

3 crs.

HSV593 Field Practicum I

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HSV593

Field Practicum I - 3 credits

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your Academic Advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses.

Prerequisites: Clinical Concentration: HSV520 or HSV521 and HSV524; NPM: One core and one concentration course; A + D concentration: One Core and HSV532.

and HSV594 Field Practicum II

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HSV594

Field Practicum II - 3 credits

A two-module field placement designed to provide students with supervised human service experience in their particular areas of specialization. In addition to working in two field settings for a total of 360 hours, students are required to attend three online seminars for the first module of each field practicum. You are also required to contact your Academic Advisor prior to registering for these courses to insure that you have taken the necessary steps to secure a field placement prior to beginning these courses.

Prerequisites: Clinical Concentration: HSV520 or HSV521 and HSV524; NPM: One core and one concentration course; A + D concentration: One Core and HSV532.


or
HSV595 Advanced Field Practicum I

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HSV595 and HSV596

Advanced Field Practicum I and II – 3 credits each (total 6 credits)

This course provides future human services managers, clinicians, and alcohol and drug treatment providers with the opportunity to put human services theory and principles into practice. The student will have the opportunity to learn by experience through a field placement at an approved human services agency in the community. Also of critical importance to the experience, the student will have an opportunity to share with his/her instructor and peers in detail the opportunities and challenges experienced at the practicum experience. A student who engages in this practicum experience is afforded the opportunity to gain additional practicum hours, which are invaluable in seeking employment in a human service agency. The student is also more likely to be well rounded and a more experienced clinician upon completion of the experience. Additionally, the student will be more competitive when seeking practicum placements where students (such as MSW or MA in Counseling Psychology) are competing with practicum placements with non-human services programs that require additional practicum hours. Each section (i.e., HSV 595 and HSV 596) requires a minimum of 550 hours of on-site experience. HSV595 and HSV596 provide an alternative to taking HSV593 and HSV594 and will be considered a course substitution.

Prerequisites: Clinical Concentration: HSV520 or HSV521 and HSV524; NPM: One core and one concentration course; A & D concentration: One Core and HSV532.

and HSV596 Advanced Field Practicum II

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HSV595 and HSV596

Advanced Field Practicum I and II – 3 credits each (total 6 credits)

This course provides future human services managers, clinicians, and alcohol and drug treatment providers with the opportunity to put human services theory and principles into practice. The student will have the opportunity to learn by experience through a field placement at an approved human services agency in the community. Also of critical importance to the experience, the student will have an opportunity to share with his/her instructor and peers in detail the opportunities and challenges experienced at the practicum experience. A student who engages in this practicum experience is afforded the opportunity to gain additional practicum hours, which are invaluable in seeking employment in a human service agency. The student is also more likely to be well rounded and a more experienced clinician upon completion of the experience. Additionally, the student will be more competitive when seeking practicum placements where students (such as MSW or MA in Counseling Psychology) are competing with practicum placements with non-human services programs that require additional practicum hours. Each section (i.e., HSV 595 and HSV 596) requires a minimum of 550 hours of on-site experience. HSV595 and HSV596 provide an alternative to taking HSV593 and HSV594 and will be considered a course substitution.

Prerequisites: Clinical Concentration: HSV520 or HSV521 and HSV524; NPM: One core and one concentration course; A & D concentration: One Core and HSV532.

6 crs.

HSV698 Capstone Research Project I

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HSV698

Capstone Research Project I - 2 credits

In this course, students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real-life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on an “area of interests” statement created at the culmination of HSV512 and a comprehensive literature search, students will submit a research proposal for review and approval. NOTE: No transfer credits are allowed for this course.

Prerequisite: HSV512 and 21-24 credits

2 crs.

HSV699 Capstone Research Project II

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HSV699

Capstone Research Project II — 2 credits

Students will apply an action research approach to the development of an applied research project proposal. Students will be required to design practiced-based projects based on the application of human services principles to specific real life problems to demonstrate theory applied to practice. Based on work completed in HSV 698, students will complete their applied research project by creating and submitting remaining aspects of the project including the gathering data section, data analysis and interpretation section, findings and implications leading towards action section, reference section, abstract section, first rough draft, and the final submission of the completed project. Students are required to have successfully completed HSV 698 before completing this course. NOTE: No transfer credits are allowed for this course.

Prerequisite: HSV698

 


    Prerequisite: HSV698

2 crs.

Master of Science in Human Services concentration
Clinical Counseling within Organizational Settings

12 crs.

Courses

Credits

HSV520  Theories of Counseling

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HSV520

Theories of Counseling - 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of counseling theory and fosters the development of basic counseling skills. The focus is establishing a rapport, developing a therapeutic alliance, and conceptualizing strategies for intervention. The clinical application of theory will be explored through case studies, understanding research, and class discussions.

3 crs.

HSV521  Family Systems Theory

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HSV521

Family Systems Theory - 3 Credits

Introduces the student to the field of family therapy and systems thinking. The student learns the skills necessary to begin clinical work with a family. Includes the major theoretical approaches to family intervention required to conceptualize, assess, and treat family systems.

3 crs.

HSV522  Group Therapy

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HSV522

Group Therapy - 3 Credits

This course presents a theoretical and experiential overview of group processes and counseling techniques. Students will be exposed to the skills and characteristics required to facilitate cognitive, emotional and behavioral change in group settings.  Students will also learn about the various populations served and presenting problems addressed by group approaches.

Prerequisite: HSV520 and/or HSV521.


    Prerequisite: HSV520 and/or HSV521

3 crs.

HSV524  Psychopathology and Psychological Assessment

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HSV524

Psychopathology and Psychological Assessment - 3 Credits

Students will explore the emotional, cognitive, somatic, and behavioral symptoms of mental disturbances.  This course includes the introduction of testing and measurement devices that emphasizes clinical assessment applications.

Prerequisite: HSV520 or HSV521


    Prerequisite: HSV520 or HSV521

3 crs

Grand Total

37 crs.

Additional Master of Science in Human Services Electives in Professional Counseling

Optional

Courses

Credits

HSV552 Professional & Ethical Orientation to Counseling

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HSV552

Professional and Ethical Orientation to Counseling - 3 Credits

This course provides students with a realistic view of several critical issues which counselors in the field of human services encounter, in addition to providing best practices in addressing these dilemmas. Human service professionals often face ethical issues such as professionalism, aspirational ethics, decisions making, mandated reporting, crisis intervention and/or legal issues on a daily basis. Professional practice in a multicultural society, client rights and responsibilities will also be explored, in addition to confidentiality, privileged communication, record keeping, and other key issues that counselors are also addressed.

Prerequisite: Either (a) 21-24 completed hours of graduate coursework in the Post University MSHSV graduate program, or (b) a comparable number of graduate coursework hours in a helping-related program at another college or university.

3 crs.

HSV554 Multicultural Issues in Human Services

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HSV554

Multicultural Issues in Human Services - 3 Credits

This course provides students with knowledge in the ways in which issues of multiculturalism can affect human services delivery. Course content includes examinations of oppression, discrimination, sexism, and other forms of prejudice, and their influence on the delivery of human services to culturally diverse and oppressed communities.

Prerequisite: Either (a) 21-24 completed hours of graduate coursework in the Post University MSHSV graduate program or (b) a comparable number of graduate coursework in a helping-related program at another college or university.

3 crs.

HSV556 Career Counseling, Appraisal, and Development

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HSV556

Career Counseling, Appraisal, and Development - 3 Credits

This course provides students with an introduction to the history of the career development practice. The course also explores the process of career counseling, assessments, and information dissemination. Students will also become familiar with the process of helping individuals take action in preparing for work in our present society in terms of employability skills and placement services. The course will also discuss the process of creating career development programs in both the public and private sector in addition to exploring trends and issues in the labor market and job search process.

Prerequisite: Either (a) 21-24 completed hours of graduate coursework in the Post University MSHSV graduate program, or (b) a comparable number of graduate coursework hours in a helping-related program at another college or university.

3 crs.

HSV558 Testing and Appraisal of Individuals and Groups in Human Services

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HSV558

Testing and Appraisal of Individuals and Groups in Human Services - 3 credits

This course provides students with an introduction to psychological assessment measures commonly used individually or in group settings in a variety of human service agencies. The course is designed to provide students with information about test construction, administration, scoring, and interpretation. An introduction to intellectual, emotional, behavioral, and personality assessments for both children and adults will be examined.

Prerequisite: Either (a) 21-24 completed hours of graduate coursework in the Post University MSHSV graduate program or (b) a comparable number of graduate coursework in a helping-related program at another college or university.

3 crs.

 

The university reserves the right to change or update the curriculum at any time. The university will notify students of any changes officially through the university website.

If you’re interested in becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor: Licensure is a professional process that varies from state to state. Please consult the appropriate state agency to determine the specific requirements for licensure in your state.

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling and Counselor Education – 58 Credit Hrs

Doctor of Human Services Counseling – 42 Credit Hours

Or

Complete the D.Hsc for 42 hours and move into the Ph.D., C.C.E. for only an additional 20 Hours.

 

Courses

 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling and Counselor Education is designed to prepare graduates for academic positions and other careers in Counselor Education or Rehabilitation Counseling. Building on the entry level competencies of the master's degree in counseling or rehabilitation counseling.

 

The doctoral program consists of approximately 96 to 99 graduate course credits beyond the baccalaureate degree, with an additional 9-15 dissertation credits. Students must complete a minimum of 48 credits of course work (excluding dissertation) at Dayspring Christian University. The doctoral program of study incorporates didactic and experiential learning and includes a cognate area of study involving at least nine semester credits, which are usually completed outside of the department. The Doctor of Human Services requires less Credit hours but some of the workload is the same.

 

In addition to meeting national accreditation standards, our program claims special expertise in five distinct areas. Students can expect unique opportunities, including conducting research, in any or all of the following:

 

Clinical Supervision

Developing the knowledge and skills necessary to train and supervise counselors and counselors-in-training, and to teach supervision to others.

 

College Mental Health Counseling

Developing the knowledge and clinical skills necessary to work within a college counseling context  with students who present with a wide range of developmental and mental health concerns.

 

Counseling People with Disabilities

Developing the knowledge and skills necessary to ensure full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of living.

 

The Future Professoriate

Developing the knowledge and skills necessary to assume academic, administrative, and professional leadership roles related to the professoriate.

Social Justice and Urban Youth

Developing the knowledge, skills, and awareness necessary to identify and confront the institutionalized forms of discrimination which continue to perpetuate disparities in social, academic, and career opportunities for urban youth.

 

The strengths of our doctoral program are numerous. Current and past doctoral students have offered the following comments on the quality of D.C.U.'s program:

 

Faculty who are recognized yet student-focused

 

Multiple opportunities for clinical supervision

 

Opportunities and support for developing teaching skills DCU offered programs

 

Flexible policies allowing doctoral students to use DCU support for summer courses

 

Encouragement and support to attend and present at national conferences

 

Opportunities to develop research skills as part of on-going research teams

 

The doctoral program at D.C.U. has clearly defined prerequisites for entry into its program,and a carefully designed (though adequately flexible) course of study for its students. Below you will find information regarding the course work you must bring with you into the program, as well as a detailed look at the classes required for this degree.

 

Prospective doctoral students must demonstrate that they have completed all the required course work in a master's degree curriculum. Should new students enter the doctoral program with course deficits, they will be able to complete such course work as part of the doctoral program of study.

 

Required doctoral courses in counseling:

COURSE #

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COU 876

Seminar in Ecological Counseling

3

COU 874

Theory and Practice of Clinical Supervision

3

COU 872

Advanced Theory and Practice in Group Work

3

COU 878

Seminar in Counseling Theory

3

COU 882

Seminar in Professional Issues

3

COU 950

Doctoral Internship

6-9

COU 860

Advanced Practicum in Counseling

3

COU 910

Doctoral Research Seminar

3

 

Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 600 hours of internship activity during their program of study. These hours may be distributed over a number of semesters. Activities that are included in the internship include teaching or co-teaching master's level courses in counselor education or rehabilitation counseling, supervision of individual students in master's level practical/internships in the programs, and/or counseling assignments in university/school/agency settings. Each doctoral student's internship experience will be planned with the advisor according to the student's prior experience and career plan. Therefore, the weights for each activity may differ across students.   

 

The Research Seminar is open to all doctoral students. Its purpose is two-fold:

to assist entry-level student movement into a scientist-practitioner model by involving them in the research apprenticeship and/or dissertation research planning and activity of the advanced doctoral students

to provide advanced doctoral students a setting in which they can examine and develop strategies for research topic selection and proposal writing

Required courses in statistics and research (choose one track):

COURSE #

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

Sample Qualitative Research Methods Sequence

EDU 603

Introduction to Qualitative Reseach

3

EDP 647

Statistical Thinking and Applications

3

EDU 810

Advanced Seminar in Qualitative Methods I

3

EDU 815

Advanced Seminar in Qualitative Methods II

3

Sample Quantitative Research Methods Sequence

EDU 603

Introduction to Qualitative Reseach

3

EDP 647

Statistical Thinking and Applications

3

EDP 791

Advanced Seminar in Quantitative Research I

3

COU/EDU 886

Multivariate Research Methods

3

Required cognate (minor): 9-12 credits

 

An area of expertise will be established with 9-12 credits of doctoral level course work. Course work for areas of expertise will be determined by the student in consultation with the doctoral advisor. Although most cognate areas will be completed outside the department (e.g., behavioral psychology, cultural foundations, research, higher education practices, human development, spirituality or women's studies), it is possible to complete a cognate within the department (e.g., group work, clinical supervision, school counseling, rehabilitation counseling).